The Engines of the Kanjozoku

Running the Osaka Loop is all about driving ability, which makes the Civic a perfect machine for the job. Since it is important to maintain maneuverability and nimbleness, you won’t find very many Civics that are over-powered. Popping the hood of one of these Hondas will more than likely reveal a highly-responsive B16A engine, or its larger displacement brethren, the B18C. Rarely will you ever see a K-series engine swap and the B-series engines being used do not even have major modifications to them. Since this is such a high-risk hobby, the possibility of ruining the car or losing it is always a factor so it just makes sense to keep the modifications minimal. It is also traditional to keep the motors lightly-modded because the old Civic one-make circuit races of old were often relegated to having basic mods or no mods at all.

B16A engine being used in an EF Civic hatchback from TOP GUN Racing.

B16A engine being used in an EF Civic hatchback from TOP GUN Racing.

This B16A even features a custom valve cover though you’ll rarely ever see it with the hood popped.

This B16A even features a custom valve cover though you’ll rarely ever see it with the hood popped.

A rare sight to see in the Osaka Kanjo community; a K20 swap in an EK9 Civic Type R.

A rare sight to see in the Osaka Kanjo community; a K20 swap in an EK9 Civic Type R.

A factory B16B Type R engine that remains untouched inside of an EK9 CTR from LAW BREAK

A factory B16B Type R engine that remains untouched inside of an EK9 CTR from LAW BREAK

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